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Fulv

Printing with Ultimaker PC a total of 10 parts on the same build plate with Z hopping?

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Hello everyone,

I need to print 10 small parts on the same build plate and before I start printing them I would like to know if any of you has any tips to give me especially about the setting for the Z hopping.

I am using an Ultimaker 3 printer

Material is the Ultimaker PC in white

The picture of the product is attached.

I am looking forward to hearing from you guys :)

Thank you in advance.

Fulvio 

Capture.PNG

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Actually, since printing 10 parts together will not save you time compared to printing them one by one, I would advise you to print them one by one. PC requires glue, brim and an enclosure, it will be easier to print them one by one, and you will not loose the whole batch if there's a failure at some point. It's better to have to restart one part that failed two hours into printing than ten that failed fifteen hours into printing.

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If you print it on the Ultimaker adhesion sheets with the printer front closed adhesion will not fail. You might want to consider to print more than one at once as the bed has to heat up to 107 degC. That takes quite a while (about 15 min).

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Sorry I may not agree. If by "one by one" you mean put one model on the print bed and print it ten times then then that will take a lot longer; yup15min per model is the figure I use. If you mean put all the ten models on the bed and use the Cura function "Print Sequence:One at a time" lol then I do agree.

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@yellowshark I did mean one model at a time, I don't think that 'Print Sequence: One at a time' would work with those models: they're too tall.

 

You can easily print one model at a time with little wait time in between prints if you just swap out the glass bed. That requires you to have two of them handy, which was an assumption that might not be true for @Fulv.

 

@Dim3nsioneer I don't think that you can ever be 100% sure that the print will not fail, even if you take every precautions possible. You can lower the probability of failure, but never eliminate it 100% Mostly because there are also external factors that you cannot control and always a part of luck.

 

Having tried several times to print multiple big pieces, and lost many hours due to unforeseen problems causing the print to fail, I'd rather loose 10-15 minutes between prints than 15 hours or 20 hours if it fails near the end, or when I'm not in front of my printer, and have to start again. Even more with PC since it isn't the easiest material to print with. But, to each their own.

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38 minutes ago, Brulti said:

I don't think that you can ever be 100% sure that the print will not fail, even if you take every precautions possible. You can lower the probability of failure, but never eliminate it 100% Mostly because there are also external factors that you cannot control and always a part of luck.

 

Never tell me the odds ?

 

I agree, that's why I wrote "adhesion will not fail" and not "the print will not fail"... the adhesion sheets really hold PC very nicely down. Of course you can always imagine someone doing something stupid like smearing oil on the adhesion sheets but with at least average intelligent people using the printer I still think my statement is pretty safe.

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Hi @Brulti, well yes if you have an oven in the next room then yes ,fair do's? I have a separate garden workshop and when it is peeing with rain walking back to the house is not an attractive option!

 

I do not think height is important, on model change the extruder will be travelling across the bed 0.3mm high and will hit any model if that is where the path takes it. - actually not true, it is the widest piece of the model that is important - but normally the total height of the model is irrelevant.

 

The point is you can control the pathway. I am not sure where Cura is on this, I have not tried and of the 3.n versions and there has been postings on the forum for precisely this point.

 

But... if you load a model and then duplicate it a number of times then Cura seems to pay no regard to this (hence the postings!) BUT if you LOAD the model individually 12 times you can position each one so that the pathway is intelligent, lol based on your intelligence, which is why the Cura developers seem not to want to give you the control. Cura prints the last loaded model 1st and the previous model 2nd... and the 1st loaded model last. By thinking about the pathway from the currently printed model to the next model you get the job done. I will admit I have not printed more than 6 models like this and no doubt the more you have the more difficult it gets,but it does work because I done it.

Edited by yellowshark
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may I agree with everyone? ?

 

It all depends if @Fulv have enclousure, what type of adhesion he uses and how is his experience with this material.

 

If he doesn't have experience with PC it may be prudent start doing one bottle and them multiple prints when he feels secure for it.

Edited by fergazz
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25 minutes ago, Dim3nsioneer said:

 

Never tell me the odds ?

 

 

Three thousand seven hundred twenty to one!

Sorry... ?

 

And you're right, I read a bit too fast, adhesion wouldn't fail in what you describe.

 

@yellowshark I've never tried the 'print on by one' feature but, in the case at hand, I don't see how it would be possible to print 10 of such tall objects because the axles would hit what you previously printed. Plus the size of the printhead on a UM3, while smaller than the UM3E, would probably not allow the printing of so many objects together anyway.

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Thank you all for sending your comments :)

I have successfully printed one at the time and also 3 at the time without any problems so far.

I am now going to try to print 4 but I am adding a z hopping of 2mm (with combine off).

if this works, I feel confident that I can print 10 parts at the time.

I am using the ultimaker advance kit which consists of the front cover and the ultimaker adhesive sheet.

Any comments, tips or advise are very welcome :)

I have attached the CURA project to this post for your reference.

UM3_000168---LC 12 RETAINING RING REMOVAL TOOL-v01.3mf

Edited by Fulv

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Hi @Brulti yup you are right and I am stupid. I do not print multiple models that often and thinking back, when I have printed multiples the models have been short in height and so have not clashed with the axles. I was answering based on my experience rather than stopping and thinking about it, my apologies!!!

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