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Posted · No mesh to write

I inhereted gcode models from a previous colleague.  However, the models are no where to be found.  I'm trying to see if I can export the model from the gcode file.  I've tried stl, obj, etc. but keep getting an error message, "There is no mesh to write".  Does anyone have any suggestions? How can I export the data to a usable format?  

 

This was created with the Ultimaker 2, and we now have the Ultimaker 3.  There is no separation in filament types.  The current model allows for a dissolve-able filament, while the previous one didn't (to the best of my knowledge). I've also seen the message, "G-code file can not be modified".

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Posted · No mesh to write

1) You can google "gcode to mesh converter" or "gcode to stl converter".  It's a pretty ugly process.  I don't recommend it.  Your part will look very ugly and rough.

2) You can contact the "previous colleague".  He'll probably say something like - "it's in the git repository!" or "I left it in 15 locations so you couldn't miss it" or something like that.

3) You can create the part from scratch again in CAD.  It's good practice - each time I use CAD I get better at it.  And faster.  It's time well spent.

4) As a stop gap measure you can just print it on the UM2 until you do one of the steps above.

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Posted · No mesh to write

1) I can try that.  Thank you.

2) That is not an option. The employee did not leave the company on good terms.

3) Also, not an option. It was digitally scanned from an archaeological artifact. 

4) The previous employee did not use the printer properly, and it is now broken beyond repair. 

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Posted · No mesh to write

Slicer PE can read gcode files and export the toolpath as a model. Te result will not be like the original scan, but at least something.

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Posted · No mesh to write

Making a fine print from the original gcode, and then sand, smooth and paint that. And then 3D-scan and digitize that 3D-model? Would that be an option? Then at least you have a nice original to start from.

 

But even when people leave a company in bad terms, you might be able to get them to cooperate, if you were not personally involved in the conflict too much. Most people can make that distinction.

 

Also, doing a thorough search on STL, OBJ, and whatever else files on servers and local computers might give some results. Do this from a bootable stick, so you get around Windows read/write permissions. Temporary directories often contain copies of old files.

 

Undelete-software might also help.

 

On most servers there is a "shadow copy" service running: deleted files can be recovered for up to several months or years, depending on the setup. This is because most data-loss comes from accidental deleting the wrong directory of file, and people not finding out before they are some weeks further. So, contact your admin and ask about this. We here can recover those deleted files ourself, by making hidden files and directories visible, and then go to the shadow-copy directories.

 

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