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randyinla

Anyone able to actually print 230mm wide on U2?

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I tried printing out a panel that was 225mm wide with no brim or "outline". The specs state the build width can go up to 230mm. When I import the model into Cura, it's grayed out and I can't print it. I went into printer specifications and told it the U2 can print 232mm wide. Only then would it allow me to print. The right fan bumped/scraped along the right inside wall, so I aborted, bent the fan shrowd in just a tad and printed again with no issue.

Even though I chose "center on print bed" in Cura, the entire piece seemed shifted to the right by maybe a cm when printed. I have to print up a new revision and will try manually moving it to the left in Cura a bit and see if that helps.

Possibly related: The right 2mm thick wall of the piece also came out very thin. Maybe .5mm. Don't know if that was Cura or maybe a bad edit in Solidworks?

Shouldn't I be able to print to the full width of the specs of the machine?

 

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On a factory-assembled machine, yes, you should.

On a self-built, or at least self-calibrated machine, there are several factors:

1. Build platform area. (Also, take into account that some space may get lost to the clamping mechanism for the build surface) *

2. Placing the build platform at the correct coordinates so that the printer gantry can actually move across the whole platform.

3. Tune your limit switches to cover the full platform area

4. Firmware limit (soft endstops)

5. Cura machine settings

* IIRC the UM2 Cura profile has "cutouts" in the corners where the metal clips are, but extends to the full width for the rest of the platform. I don't have one myself, so that's no first-hand experience...

 

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On a factory-assembled machine, yes, you should.

 

On a self-built, or at least self-calibrated machine, there are several factors:

 

1. Build platform area. (Also, take into account that some space may get lost to the clamping mechanism for the build surface) *

2. Placing the build platform at the correct coordinates so that the printer gantry can actually move across the whole platform.

3. Tune your limit switches to cover the full platform area

4. Firmware limit (soft endstops)

5. Cura machine settings

 

 

* IIRC the UM2 Cura profile has "cutouts" in the corners where the metal clips are, but extends to the full width for the rest of the platform. I don't have one myself, so that's no first-hand experience...

It is a stock, factory-assembled U2. The part wasn't tall enough (talking Y axis) to come close to the metal clips on the glass corners. It remained grayed out in Cura no matter where I tried to drag-n-drop it. Seems it's a Cura thing and not a limit switch thing as adjusting the limit switches will have no effect on what Cura assumes my build area dimensions are. Though, for fine tuning the machine, checking those switches seems like a great idea! The Cura machine settings had defaulted to 230mm x 225mm when I originally told it I had an U2. Cura only allowed me to generate gcode after I told it my U2 was 232mm x 225mm.

 

I've just printed a part 252mm wide inclined 45º on top of the bed.

Hey! That's cheating!! :-P If I had a 2nd hot end and some water-soluble support material, I'd GLADLY print on an upwards angle!

 

The spec assumes that you have a (never going to happen) dual-extruder UM2. Here in reality, the machine cannot print all the way to the right, because the single nozzle is in the left hole of the two in the supporting plate.

I thought Ultimaker finally solved their dual-head dilemma a month-or-so ago and are implementing that as a kit? Supposed to be 1st quarter of 2015, no? Either way, I'll have to manually move the gantry left/right and measure where the single head lines up. I assumed the published 230mm width meant I could print that with the machine as it was when purchased. Never said anything like, "230mm (with purchase of dual head upgrade)" :)

 

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I raised exactly this issue (except I think I needed 223.6 mm) and my piece was 219 in the Y direction, a 214 mm circle with a few bumps sticking out. see "Settings to achieve max build envelope" in this forum

I was unhappy with messing with the end stops, but on the advice of iRoberti that's what it took. Physically bending the actuating arm.

 

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The spec assumes that you have a (never going to happen) dual-extruder UM2. Here in reality, the machine cannot print all the way to the right, because the single nozzle is in the left hole of the two in the supporting plate.

 

That doesn't count, because even with dual extrusion you'd still reach only the same spots per nozzle...

Maybe the spec is just wrong ;)

 

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  1. Remove skirt. That will add a few mm.
  2. Add a small brim. For some reason, Cura will let you print a larger object with a brim of 1-2 than without a brim.
  3. Change size of the build plate in Cura.
    I did this step in small increments and always printing the outline to see how far I can go without bumping into clips/wall.
  4. The object will be off-center as the printing head is not in the middle.
  5. If needed you can remove the clips and use something else to hold the glass plate.

 

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And don't forget to put it on youmagine :smile:

 

I made a customized one i'm using successfully (the ones i wanted to use cooled my heater bluck to much)

..and i planned to finish with testing and then upload it as my first youmagine model :wink:

Edit: if someone wants such a smaller fan shroud i can design one..

 

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  • [*]Remove skirt. That will add a few mm.

[*]Add a small brim. For some reason, Cura will let you print a larger object with a brim of 1-2 than without a brim.

[*]Change size of the build plate in Cura.

I did this step in small increments and always printing the outline to see how far I can go without bumping into clips/wall.

[*]The object will be off-center as the printing head is not in the middle.

[*]If needed you can remove the clips and use something else to hold the glass plate.

 

 

1) There was no skirt (or brim) (Couldn't remember the word 'skirt' when I made the original post. Called it 'outline')

2) That's interesting that adding a brim will trick Cura into printing larger! I am curious to try that and see what happens.

3) That's what I did the other night to get it to work. Made it 232 instead of 230... which lead to the right fan scraping the inside wall. Bending the right fan shroud (temporarily, of course) did the trick for that print.

4) Even though the print head is off center to the left, my print was centered more right than center :???: Strange. From what others have said here, I bet if I tweaked my left stop switch a little more left, the Home position would be a little more left as well. Might end up with better centered prints that way.... glass lining up with where Cura thinks it is.

5) For this print, the clips weren't an issue. Plenty of room in the 'Y'. But good suggestion. Will have to remember that if needed.

 

6. model new fan shroud with higher angle for the sidefans, this can make +10mm each side i bet

 

At some point, I wanted to research a new fan shroud. I wonder if mounting a single, more powerful fan somewhere higher/centered and have dual ports split that off to both sides... or even all around the print head? With an LED light ring to boot! That should save 20-40mm. Again, no sense worrying about a future 2nd head getting in the way.

 

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2) That's interesting that adding a brim will trick Cura into printing larger! I am curious to try that and see what happens.

 

I should mention that I did this several months ago, i.e. several versions of Cura ago. The latest version may be doing things differently.

By the way, if you are printing such a large object, you may need a brim to prevent edges from lifting off.

 

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Some people above are confused about a few things:

1) First of all you should be able to get 230mm travel with only one nozzle. With two nozzles in theory I suppose you can get another 25mm or so.

2) when you choose "no brim" you get a skirt so you can't print as big. Instead perhaps choose a brim but with length 0 and passes=0.

3) Telling the machine that it's 232mm wide will move the center over 1mm and so it won't be centered properly and hence you get a .5mm wall instead of a 2mm wall because the head is hitting the block (gently of course).

 

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I'm not sure what physical travel I am or am not getting. I was just going off what Cura would allow me to position on the virtual print bed. My 225mm wide model remained grayed out no matter where I dragged it until I told Cura that the width of my machine was 232mm.

I have my skirt already set to 0. Are you saying that even with that set, it still takes some external space into consideration?

After gently bending my right fan mount, the gantry never hit the right wall, yet, the right wall of my object ended up very thin instead of 1.6mm.

I haven't had time to revisit this piece as it was fine as a first draft and I had other pieces to print that fit onto it. I should be able to update the model and try printing again next week. And I will try using a brim with 0 length and 0 passes.

Thanks!

 

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Some people above are confused about a few things:

1) First of all you should be able to get 230mm travel with only one nozzle. With two nozzles in theory I suppose you can get another 25mm or so.

...

 

Shouldn't you actually lose a few millimeters? If you have two nozzles, you still need to be able to reach all places with every nozzle. What good is it if you have areas that are only reachable by one nozzle?

You will lose "distance between nozzles" because the one on the right will not be able to reach as far left as the one on the left.

And you can't say you gain a few millimeters on the right, because the nozzle on the left still can't reach that area..

 

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I'm not sure about skirt length 0 versus brim length 0. I don't print this large more than twice and I forget what I did. If it didn't print the skirt then cura probably didn't take that into account so not sure why 225 model couldn't fit in 230. It should.

Just note that when you lie and tell it you have 232mm bed it's going to move the center of the part over 1mm and you are more likely to hit the right side. By 1mm.

 

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Jonny's got it it right. If the second nozzle were functional, you would still not be able to print at the extreme right using the left nozzle, because of the spacing between the two nozzles.

Bottom line is that the UM2 cannot meet its build-volume specs, as I pointed out here in another thread a year ago.

 

Just curious, do you what the actual build volume is that the UM2 can achieve? I'd like to have that information, save me the trouble of running a bunch of tests.

 

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I always assumed the published print volume was the max x/y/z distance the tip of the hot end can reach. I'm curious to make some tests tonight to check max X/Y. Something like a long, thin "stick" with a few mm high walls to see if it can reach the max distance AND create the proper wall thicknesses. As I mentioned above, when I finally got my original model to print, the right wall came out to be maybe 15% the thickness of the left wall, and it was not because the gantry hit the wall, which it never did.

 

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