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LePaul

So maybe white is tougher to print....

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Everyone mentions white is tricky to get good results in.

My first print with ColorFabb PLA/PHA Standard White was good. Now this second print has a few things that make me wonder what else to tweak...

Note the top. I have the top/bottom thickness at 1.2mm

I printed on my UMO using the following settings:

Layer height 0.1

Printing Temp 200C

Speed: 35 mm/sec

Fill Density: 25%

No tangles...spool moves freely.

image2.thumb.JPG.29b8a7b9b1594b0b367e7b8ef3969d1c.JPG

One thing I may have found...my caliper battery died so I couldn't measure the filament, so I left it at 2.85 I am really curious if the filament is +/- .05 And if that would make a difference?

image2.thumb.JPG.29b8a7b9b1594b0b367e7b8ef3969d1c.JPG

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It looks like your getting underextrusion. There are a couple things you can do. You may want to increase your temp a little or slow down your print speed. Also check the tension in your belts to make sure there isn't any slack in the X-Y axis. With hard plastics like PLA when you get to the end of a spool the filament is tightly wound and can cause additional resistance inside the bowden tube. You can try swapping to a new roll and see if that solves the problem. I use "straighteners" on our machines and they make a big difference.

https://www.youmagine.com/designs/um2-filament-straightener

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Thank you for your reply

I tried another two prints last night.

This is a new spool of @ColorFabb PHA/PLA Standard White. The spool is moving freely, I've rotated it 2 or 3 times so the spool is slightly unwound for easier extruding.

Ulimaker Original

200 C

34 mm/sec

Bottom/Top thickness 1.2

Fill Density 24%

I used my caliper to measure the diameter and got a reading of 2.84 , 2.85 and 2.9 along a 6 inch stretch of filament. I stuck to 2.85

The flat piece went well.

The bigger piece is showing some overhang troubles. In Cura 15.04.2 I have support "Touching Build Plate" but apparently it didn't feel it needed any. The smaller piece did need supports and those printed.

I know others have had troubles with white filaments and since I have a large project in white coming up (BB-8 droid), I really want to sort out the right settings!

Here's some pictures

white.thumb.JPG.618c243bb01ff680d0d31f0c24e0cc65.JPG

white2.thumb.JPG.0e2b706388f00ae235058124ea64a451.JPG

white3.thumb.JPG.bda1b3228d56185224ed77a050e6c2f9.JPG

white.thumb.JPG.618c243bb01ff680d0d31f0c24e0cc65.JPG

white2.thumb.JPG.0e2b706388f00ae235058124ea64a451.JPG

white3.thumb.JPG.bda1b3228d56185224ed77a050e6c2f9.JPG

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@gr5 I wonder if poking the heat up a few ticks would help?

The small parts do great on these settings but the bigger ones....not so much.

As to the belts, well, they don't twang like a guitar string but don't appear loose. My UMO is noisy so I haven't detected anything new or problematic. I just did 18 prints in ColorFabb black in varying sizes that all came out well.

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In Cura 15.04.2 I have support "Touching Build Plate" but apparently it didn't feel it needed any.

It's a setting in the expert settings, you set the angle at which you want the support to kick in.

overhang.png.ca440d1ce816fad3ddaca94d885ac3f2.png

 

I've seen that setting and been hesitant to mess with it. :) Do most leave it at 45 or tick it down?

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I try to print without supports whenever possible. If your angles are too steep you could try breaking the model up into multiple pieces or orienting it in such a way you don't need supports. I usually use 60 degrees for my prints. What are your fan speeds? Better cooling usually helps with steep overhangs.

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About over hangs. On my UMO/UMO+ Try to have the over hang face the single fan.  over hangs on the down wind side always look a little droopy. Sometimes this is not possible thou.

And maybe go cooler, most of my colorFabb prints great at 190C. I am actually planning on opening my 1st box of colorFabb standard white today. So this post is great timing.

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White prints pretty well for most areas (like walls) but it tends to be more liquidy. Less viscous. So it is more likely to leak/string and it doesn't do overhangs quite as well. But top surfaces should be fine. I tend to print white at a lower temp - maybe 15C lower. And then I end up also having to print slower because I'm afraid of underextrusion even if it's not necessarily a problem.

I think you had trouble on that top surface because it is over an overhang and it took a while for the layers to "catch up". Maybe if you rotate the part so the circle is down? or increase infill to 24%? Or higher?

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I've seen you post this a few times...

Print slower and hotter! Here are top recommended speeds for .2mm layers (twice as fast for .1mm layers):

20mm/sec at 200C

30mm/sec at 210C

40mm/sec at 225C

50mm/sec at 240C

I am printing at 0.1 so using the above, that would translate to...

40mm/sec at 200C

60mm/sec at 210C

80mm/sec at 225C

100mm/sec at 240C

Maybe I should re-check the filament?

I did when I first loaded it and there seemed to be a few spots at 2.9 mm but some at 2.83 and 2.84, so I went with the average of 2.85

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You only had underextrusion in that one spot - it's not because of the temp or speed or feeder - it's because the layers below aren't high enough. At least I'm 90% sure. having filament down to 2.5mm would be (2.85/2.5)^2 or 30% underextrusion - I suppose that might be enough to cause what you saw - but it would be a problem in the entire layer - not just that one spot. I really doubt this is a filament diameter issue.

I think it's just having trouble on the underside - maybe show a photo from the other side - I bet the layer looks pertty bad on the bottom side of that bad spot. Maybe if you could design some support structure underneath it would work out better.

I could be totally wrong but in the photo it looks like it's only underextruding in that one spot.

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I always thought white filament required a slightly higher temperature.

If you say 40mm/s 200ºC I would reply with 40mm/s 215ºC.

Every filament and brand has different 'perfect zone'.

About the overhang; I would think that area could be a little bit better.

(a higher resolution could help, dunno what fan duct you use and how well it is dialed in to cool the overhang?)

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