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I have been using Cura for over two years now and I have started to notice that if the first layer has any circles to print they don’t get fully printed. I’m not sure if this is a new thing or not. I should note that I’m using Cura with a Raise3d N2 Dual printer. 

 

When end I look at the animation of the first layer in the slicer it does draw complete circles but when I watch it print the print head moves to somewhere else before the circle is complete. In other words it’s not like the extruder is failing to extrude at the end the printer just doesn’t finish the circle. 

 

I’ve attached a picture to show it. There are supposed to be three wall layers. 

05EB2DF2-D241-4E78-A9E6-11B7995132B4.jpeg

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You might need to clean that print bed (is it build tak?).

 

But more likely you just need to move the nozzle closer to the build plate.  Is this easy to adjust?  On the UM2 you just turn 3 screws all equal amounts by hand and presto - the printer will be leveled perfectly for the next few months.

 

It's hard to say how thick this bottom trace is but it looks much too thick.  You need to SQUISH that bottom layer or you get just what we see here.

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The build plate is a brand new sheet of buildtak. The nozzle is 0.8 mm so I guess that is why it looks too thick but it is squishing onto the plate just right. 

 

The point is that I was looking at the nozzle when it was printing and it never attempted to print a full circle. It got that far around the arc then went off to a different place. 

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7 hours ago, Puerlin said:

The point is that I was looking at the nozzle when it was printing and it never attempted to print a full circle.

Okay.  But what you see in slice view is what you get in gcode.  So either your printer firmware sucks or you need to video it and watch one more time.  Consider dropping the gcode into the website: gcode.ws  which will show you for sure if it's supposed to be drawing the full circle.  You can see travel versus extrusion moves quite clearly (although cura slice view shows it also - why trust cura if you don't have to).

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Thanks for the advice. I’ve dropped it into gcode.ws and it shows that full circles are in the gcode. I’m going to create a smaller simpler model and see if I can get to the bottom of this. 

 

Cheers

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The problem with small circles like this is is that the extruder changes direction quite abruptly at the en of the circle. Unless the buildplate adhesion is very good, the nozzle yanks the last bit of extruded material along with it, resulting in a non-complete circle like this.

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Ah.  So probably the print head is too far from the build plate and not squishing the filament hard enough onto the build plate to get it to stick well.  And looking again at the photo above that seems to be the case.

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