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Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

@robert. Sure you can use my pictures.

I still think the main parameters are a dirty nozzle and softer fillaments. I should have tried the nozzle after i cleaned it with a burner... but cant anymore as i drilled it to 0.6mm.

Ill report when i see it again. But have not seen it in the last weeks.

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

Good, because I was naughty and used it before I got the ok from you :p I had a feeling you'd be ok with it though :)

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

One thing I noticed with the thin hair stuff is: draft.

Last week I was printing at an event where they had a fanatic cooling system causing a cold draft. Could it be that too much cooling has something to do with this?

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

Want to see my fur?? :mrgreen:

This is a bust i printed yesterday with BioFilla Linen:

 

 

 

A lot of fur every where. It's very thin my guess is that it's thinner than real hair.

 

I will have a timelapse (tonight) of the print maybe it will show something?

 

I thought about it during the night (yes i sleep badly) here's my twisted theory on this:

 

Let's imagine that the nozzle puts some extra material at random places and that the fan blows on it creating a small hair.

 

It's so small that it would stay in glass transition due to the heated bed and the nozzle head.

 

So every time the fan blows on it, it grows a bit making it even more thin, thus more subject to the phenomenon

 

The fan theory is mine too i posted this a while ago

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

On curling, my experience this week shows me that the filament itself can be one of the causes. I was using Faberdashery gold and was getting lots of curling - to the point that I stopped and did an atomic pull. Today I spent 6 or 7 hours printing with their Arctic white and did not get a single curl. I was printing the same pieces in a different colour so used the same settings - except for extruder temp which was 5 degrees different

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

Funny I noticed the same with that gold filament last time I used it.

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

Further results on the ongoing fur saga.

I currently print with Colorfabb PLA/PHA and CO-Polyester XT. (not at the same time of course :mrgreen: )

PLA/PHA: 0.1 layers, Speed 50, temp 200, bed 60 = Not a single hair

Swap to XT: 0.1 layers, Speed 50, temp 240, bed 70 = Fur everywhere.

No matter how clean or dirty my nozzle is XT makes fur and PLA don't. It must be either the material difference or as gr5 said the higher temperature. Over the last month I have probably swapped the material for at least 10 times and it just keeps happening.

I might contact Colorfabb and ask what they think.

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

I managed to catch the hairs printing on video, you might want to look in full screen

 

What i see is tiny strings of filaments that get carried by the nozzle and are then blown away by the fans. It looks like the nozzle is catching some tiny parts from the previous layer. The nozzle is getting quite dirty during the print.

Colorfabb Marine Blue PLA

Temp: 220°c

Layers: 0.2mm

speed: 50mm/s

 

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Posted (edited) · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

Turning the fan down to 25% seems to solve this problem for me...

Edited by Guest

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

I know this thread is super old but wanted to comment on it.  I recently started having pretty bad stringing issues with most PLA filament that I hadn't had before.  I tweaked lots of setting (retraction distance, fan speed, extrusion multiplier, Z lift, etc) and printed tests with very little change in quality.  It dawned on me that most of my issues started when I switched to a hardened steel nozzle from E3D.  I had always used a brass nozzle.  Anyway, I switched back to a brass nozzle and quality with regards to stringing was improved.  If you can see the picture, the ones on the left are all prints I did by altering previously mentioned settings to try to reduce stringing.  The one on the right is after I put the brass nozzle back on.  0.4mm E3D nozzle, Prusa MK3S, 210/65, 1.5mm retraction, Z lift 0, retraction speed 60mm/s, 0.15mm ht, solutech and hatchbox pla.  I'm not sure why, in my case, the hardened steel nozzle is more prone to this.  It appears clean.

Strings.JPG

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

We call this kind of "fir" stringing.  stringing is a little bit of nozzle leakage in a straight line between two points that the nozzle moves between.

 

"hair" is usually a strange phenomenon similar to cotton candy where extra thin hairs come out of "nowhere" and get blown around and find their way everywhere with no discernable pattern.

 

Anyway, thanks for this post, it confirms some things I knew - basically internal geometry of the nozzle is important.  More expensive brass nozzles usually string less - usually they have a more gradual slope going from 4mm or 2mm I.D. down to the typical 0.4mm I.D.  The length of the final channel is important also.  If it's too short then the nozzle leaks more.

 

3dsolex.com "race" nozzles seem to string not-at-all as far as I can tell - even the 0.8mm nozzles because of their complicated internal geometry.  disclaimer: I sell 3dsolex products in USA at my store: thegr5store.com so I am biased.

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

@gr5 do you find that hardened steel nozzles produce more stringing?

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...

The one from 3dsolex does, yes, because it's 0.5mm and also because it has no internal structure.  But every manufacturer of nozzles has a different internal structure with different length of the final 0.4mm tunnel.

 

More info in this video but this guy is sometimes amazingly stupid, but usually quite smart.  He didn't notice that the channel is longer in the e3d version.  I'm pretty sure the channel length is the key difference in this case in his video.  Just watch for a few seconds starting at 12:28 (link should jump you to 12:28).

 

But check out the internals of a 3dsolex "race" nozzle!:

IMG_1818-400x519.jpg

 

 

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Posted · Furry prints ... how to get rid of the hair ...
On 6/3/2019 at 11:28 AM, gr5 said:

We call this kind of "fir" stringing.  stringing is a little bit of nozzle leakage in a straight line between two points that the nozzle moves between.

 

"hair" is usually a strange phenomenon similar to cotton candy where extra thin hairs come out of "nowhere" and get blown around and find their way everywhere with no discernable pattern.

 

Anyway, thanks for this post, it confirms some things I knew - basically internal geometry of the nozzle is important.  More expensive brass nozzles usually string less - usually they have a more gradual slope going from 4mm or 2mm I.D. down to the typical 0.4mm I.D.  The length of the final channel is important also.  If it's too short then the nozzle leaks more.

 

3dsolex.com "race" nozzles seem to string not-at-all as far as I can tell - even the 0.8mm nozzles because of their complicated internal geometry.  disclaimer: I sell 3dsolex products in USA at my store: thegr5store.com so I am biased.

I have just started to suffer from "Fir" after switching to a Micro Swiss hotend with the "high quality" nozzle that it came with.

oddly enough the cheap nozzles I had used before almost never had this problem, to the extent I did not even know it was a thing other than normal stringing.

but good to see your guys inputs here has given me great insight, I started to suspect it was the nozzle but was hesitant to try since its brand new and had no reason to preform badly.

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