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ian

Be careful with removing objects with a knife !!

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Just a friendly warning from me !

Last night before I went to bed, I finished a print of old train station roof.

The roof was welded to the glass plate of my um2.

So I first heated the bed upto 100 and when it was warm enough, I was able to get a sharp swiss army knife under some of the print.

Problem was because the PLA got so soft so quick.. the movement of the blade was twisting the PLA and that did not look so so good :-(

So I decided to take the print and the glass off the um2 and wait until every thing cooled down.

Then i still had a little space at the bottom edge of my roof.

Carefully slide in my swiss army knife under the edge and started to apply force..

and like everyone... more force and more force... in a half second the roof model shot off the glass plate and my swiss army knife shot straight into the middle section of my left arm.. taking out a chunk of my arm.. about 7mm deep and the size of a 5 cent piece...

I stood there as my arm turned instantly into a river of blood.....

I was able to take control of the situation and stop the bleeding with a few minutes.. and I think it should be fine...

But just a little warning... if you try and pull and push a piece off the hotbed... remember... that energy has to go somewhere and you only have two arms...

BE CAREFUL MY FRIENDS !

Ian :-)

 

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That's why you keep your non-knife hand on top of the object, not on the other side of it :) Personally I use uhm... I have no idea what they're called in English. You use them to spread out spackle on your walls. Basically a very thin and flexible piece of metal. And then I took the dremel to it and made the edge sharp so that I can easily wedge it under the print. After I have a few millimeters of it under the print I start prying upwards to get air under the print and it'll eventually pop right off.

 

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Gotta love the Swiss army knives...

Before my HBP upgrade I used a fixed blade that has no handle (5.11 boot knife) and is therefore very flat. It's very easy to pry off the part with that one, but usually leaves marks on the part.

With the HBP I just have to wait for the bed to cool down, then the part pops right off the plate :)

(Problem is, at the moment the heater doesn't work...)

 

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it was great fun when we cleaned the hole up and got it sealed with a transparent bandage.. it was like watching little rivers of blood running from all sides.. about 5 minutes later my arm once again looked like a blood fountain...

Im thinking of desigjing and printing some arm guards for heavy work with knifes and blades... atleast good for me :smile:

unnamed.jpg

 

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Seems that we have to be aware that 3D-printing is a dangerous, bloody thing - hopefully not prohibited because of life-dangering injouries... :-)

Honestly, I also use a kind of crocodile "that´s-not-a-knife" dundee fixed-blade knifes (bought for an outdoor trip in US) and gathered some cuts in my fingers during removing prints or cut away support...

 

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I guess this is the main reason why people buy a 3D printer: because they cannot handle ordinary tools... :p

In this regard: Hi, my name is Dim3nsioneer and I have an Ultimaker... :wink:

EDIT: Seriously, I see it as one big advantage of the 3D printer technology: People with not too much mechanical skills can create solid things... no offense to any of you!

 

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And it may also make those who cannot handle ordinary tools learn how to do so :) You come up with some design that will only work if you have a solid bar of metal somewhere, so you need to get yourself some metal and a saw. Then you need to connect something with bolts, so you go out and get that. Then your holes need threads so you go out and buy tools for that. Then you need to sand the surface for a better appearance. Then you make a lamp and have to figure out how to wire it up properly. The list goes on and on :D

*takes a look at the pile of parts for the CNC he started 3 years ago that still isn't done*

 

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Damm Dude :-)

Give me a second - have to grab my chair cause I felt down with it while laughing - that´s a great joke...

God, I love this community - nevertheless - I would be happy if you could re-change before somebody start asking "mechanical questions" bout the UM design... :-)

Sorry, still loughing....

I guess I owe you a beer if you ever come to Graz... :-)

 

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Hey Ian,

That's a bad wound! Is it better by now?

Ironically thought that you put this post in "The Art of Printing"..

But to be honest,

When I printed my Rammus Figure, I also had to use a sharp knife ( because I had no other tools available)

and Cut myself twice..

..within ten minutes.

The donkey never hits himself twice on the same rock!

(yet another dutch saying)

Cheers,

Lennart

 

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thank you for asking...

all ym friends are killing me that i didnt go to the doctor or hospital when it happened.. I just cleaned the wound and bandaged it up as tight as possible.. then slept two nights with my arm propped up in the air...

but now the wound is closed uo fully and the skin is slowly growing back into the whole.

I hope I dont have too much of a bad scare... :-)

on a brighter note... because i did hurt myself badly because i was trying my best to take a large print off the glass.. im designing one or two systems that will make this little problem go away for ever :-)

Zero fighting to get big prints with glue stick off the bed anymore :-)

Will post the design maybe at the weekend when I am finished :-)

Have a good day tomorrow my friend !

Ian :-)

 

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