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Can we open a .gcode file in Cura?

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I've been printing a lot of products and to do so I have produced a lot of .gcode files. Sometimes I do not remember what product they refer to, and I noticed that Cura can not open them again.

Why the software that produces the code cannot open them later? For sure I am missing something.

This is extremely desirable specially because I could eventually decide to change some printing settings and even going back to the STL I could miss the settings I had used before.

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Cura 2.5 can open g-code files. The feature was developed by AlephObjects (Lulzbot) and contributed back to us. Because they were working on it, we didn't build it. In the end they didn't met the deadline (also because we were quite strict with reviewing) for 2.4, so it was moved to 2.5

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also because we were quite strict with reviewing

 

I think it is important to note that all code that goes into Cura gets reviewed. A feature as big a gcode viewing consists of a lot of code, so reviewing takes a while and the chances of changes being required before the code is accepted are high. The review was not delayed because the code came from AlephObjects.

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An easy way around is to make a JPEG-image of every model you design, with the exact same name. Thus the corresponding 3D-model, STL, gcode and JPG-file all have the same name. By browsing through the JPG-files with an image viewer (e.g. IrfanView on a Windows system), you can easily find which file is which.

It doesn't work on the printer itself of course, but at least you can easily see which gcode-files to copy to SD-card.

In addition you could add the main parameters in the filename of the gcode (max 20 characters before the extension). For example:

- model_v33.rsdoc (native DesignSpark Mechanical 3D-file)

- model_v33.stl

- model_v33.jpg

- model_v33_pla.gcode (for use with my standard PLA settings)

- model_v33_plahq.gcode (for high quality PLA)

- model_v33_pet.gcode (for use with my standard PET settings)

- model_v33_petht.gcode (for high temp PET)

And you could add a txt-file with settings and additional info specific for that version, with the same name:

- model_v33.txt

(or Photoshop these settings on top of the JPG-file)

In these names you would replace "model" with a more meaningfull name, of course. The "v33" here is the 33th saved version of this design.

This method is not perfect due to the limit of 20 characters in the filename (the rest falls off the Ultimaker's little screen), but it works reasonably well for my hundreds of models and versions.

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Cura 2.4.0 has a 'Save Project' feature that saves all the information about the model: stl/obj, printer, print settings, etc.

Also, there are freeware and web based gcode viewers available so you can see what the model was and how it will print.

Hope this helps.

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Thanks guys for all the input. I know that it is possible to take pictures and take notes of all the parameters used in the making of a code. The fact is that it is absolutely obvious that, no matter how difficult it may be, the idea to be able to open a file that the software has produced is absolutely natural and the way to go.

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The fact is that it is absolutely obvious that, no matter how difficult it may be, the idea to be able to open a file that the software has produced is absolutely natural and the way to go.

Is it though? Your (2d) printer driver also streams data to your printer. Your printerdriver cannot load that data back in. Or as another example, if you export an stl file from eg Solidworks, you cannot load it back into Solidworks without loosing a lot of functionality.

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The fact is that it is absolutely obvious that, no matter how difficult it may be, the idea to be able to open a file that the software has produced is absolutely natural and the way to go.

Is it though? Your (2d) printer driver also streams data to your printer. Your printerdriver cannot load that data back in. Or as another example, if you export an stl file from eg Solidworks, you cannot load it back into Solidworks without loosing a lot of functionality.

Even so I think is an important feature to have. I use it many many times on s3d to review if something was wrong. Ofc also, is nice to just ipen a gcode and see what will print without printing it.

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Even so I think is an important feature to have.

 

I'm not debating that. The Cura 2.5 beta should be released soonish, and it has the feature. Just realise that you don't get your meshes back when loading a gcode file. You cannot change settings on the gcode file.

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Even so I think is an important feature to have.

 

I'm not debating that. The Cura 2.5 beta should be released soonish, and it has the feature. Just realise that you don't get your meshes back when loading a gcode file. You cannot change settings on the gcode file.

 

Indeed. Except ultigcode temperature, retractions, fans.

Nice to have that feature on 2.5

About getting a 3d file from an gcode, ofc never the same object but http://makeprintable.com/ is doable, not great or accurate but... a stl

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When I export a 3D file in STL I still may open it in the original software whatever one you chose. You can check how many polygons it has and also you can render the part and know what product is that. When I said that it would be natural to expect that Cura be able to open the files it produced I didn't say anything about getting back all funcionality it had before. I would just like to see the image of the part it is related to and also, if possible, know the original settings I used. Just that. I'm happy that this is coming in Cura 2.5.

 

 

The fact is that it is absolutely obvious that, no matter how difficult it may be, the idea to be able to open a file that the software has produced is absolutely natural and the way to go.

 

Is it though? Your (2d) printer driver also streams data to your printer. Your printerdriver cannot load that data back in. Or as another example, if you export an stl file from eg Solidworks, you cannot load it back into Solidworks without loosing a lot of functionality.

 

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>I've been printing a lot of products and to do so I have produced a lot of .gcode files.

Cura 15.X can open gcode files. Also you can drag and drop your file onto here and see your gcode in 3d:

gcode.ws

Or you can download and install repetier which is free and has a fantastic gcode viewer built in. You can tell which way the head is moving in repetier and see which printing lines follow which. https://www.repetier.com/

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On 3/11/2017 at 5:02 PM, gr5 said:

>I've been printing a lot of products and to do so I have produced a lot of .gcode files.

Cura 15.X can open gcode files. Also you can drag and drop your file onto here and see your gcode in 3d:

gcode.ws

Or you can download and install repetier which is free and has a fantastic gcode viewer built in. You can tell which way the head is moving in repetier and see which printing lines follow which. https://www.repetier.com/

 

I'm okay with looking uninformed, but I'm running Cura 3.2.0 (latest release, I assume, I downloaded yesterday).  What is Cura 15.x?

 

Repetier asks to connect to my printer, or something, scratch that.  Any tangible/workable solution for reviewing settings, based on generated gcode files, when I (perhaps) don't have the source STL files?

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4 hours ago, SandervG said:

Hi @wight, realize you are responding to a thread last updated close to a year ago, March 2017. Cura 15.X is the version from 2015. Just like that Cura version, the information in this thread may be outdated. I would recommend opening a new thread in Cura if you have any questions! 

 

Good point, will do, thanks @SandervG

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