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Tuesday 25th. Introducing our new friends!

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Every week I’m happy to see how many new visitors register to our forums. I’m always keeping an eye out for their posts to make sure they don’t go unanswered and consider it an opportunity to get to know each other a little bit. Still, there are a lot of new members who go by without getting to know Team Ultimaker, or all the gems in this wonderful community. I want to introduce our new friends in this category, welcoming them to our forums and hopefully it will be a first step in getting to know each other better. Ensuring we can all enjoy our time here.

With that said, welcome to the Ultimaker community! Each of you have access now to the countless of experts here and online resources available. Use it wisely :)

A great way to get started is to introduce yourself. We would like to hear from you! Please tell us something about yourself, like;

- What 3D printer do you have

- What do you (plan to) use it for

- What would you like to learn?

Since a better world starts with yourself, I’ll go ahead:

I’m Sander van Geelen, the community manager at Ultimaker. I have an Ultimaker Original+ and an Ultimaker 2+. I use them mostly for printing objects around the house that broke and I’m in the process of converting illustrations I like to make into 3D models.

Finally, what I would like to learn is what you fine folks are up to :)

Without further ado, @pbackx, @ViperJet, @LynG3, @YvesRossignol, @OOZYM, @ppowers, @agentpickle, @Raybo, @energyguyoly, @Orange_42, @SirKri5, @Margarida, @brolman, @nicoddl1, @stuart13, @Kurtenbach, @bioscope, @Sakata3d, @Ermanno … the floor is yours!

I’ll also introduce our moderator team (your best friends): @IRobertI, @Didierklein, @Flowalistik, @Gr5, @Neotko, @Nicolinux

Oh, finally, some links you might find useful:

Online resources

Useful links to get started

Welcome!

Edited by Guest
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Hi all :) I'm Peter. I bought an Ultimaker 3 last week. It is an upgrade from a cheap Prusa i3 clone kit that I bought two years ago.

What I like about the Ultimaker 3: It just works. It took my 6 months on my previous machine to get to a similar quality as my first print on the UM3. That's a lot of time (=money) saved.

What I'm still struggling with (and part of why I'm here): getting the first layer right. I'm getting slight ripples or waves in my first layer (similar to the last picture here: https://ultimaker.com/en/community/34262-pla-ripples) I'm sure I will figure it out :)

What I'm using it for: at the moment, 3D printing is a small "R&D" type activity for my business. I've made custom designs for some of my clients and I am figuring out what goes into creating my own products.

You can find me here:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/Printin3DBE

https://www.3dhubs.com/service/184305 (I need to update that page, it's on my todo list for next weekend)

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Hi @Pbackx, good to hear from you and welcome to the community :)

Going from a Prusa i3 to an Ultimaker 3 seems like a big step up, happy to hear it seems to go to your satisfaction!

Helping you through the learning curve and getting more familiar with the Ultimaker is something this community has helped countless of users with, so I am sure you are in the right place! Outside of that, there is so much more possible outside of the 'out of the box' experience, that we all discover and learn together. Hopefully you can also find your place in this!

Regarding your bed, if I'm looking at the right photo, it looks like you should level your bed slightly higher.

If it is always in the same corner, have you rotated your glass bed, to rule out this has a role these ripples?

And cool lamps! Did you print them round / cylinder shape, or flat and did you fit it around a structure after making it soft in warm water? (assuming it is a PLA print).

Have a great day!

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Hello I'm Yves Rossignol a professional engineer in mechanical design. I'm french canadian so my english can be very bad. I teach as a lecturer at local university since 1985. My main course is FEA and design of mechanical component.

In french we say that i'm a "touche à tout" "involve and interest in every thing". I'm an mechanical engineer, a structural one and I have a minor degree in metallurgy! But I have decided at 56 years old to realise my ideas. I have a lot of ideas but almost no money. I'm a heavy worker (workoholic) from 5 am to 1 am. I just have a new company involve in design and programming (all platform). I love my utlimaker 3 extended. Since last week, the printer doesn't work only 24 hours.... my last part take 69 hours to built in Nylon and PVA. I'm a power user of 3d software since 1997. So I have some knowledge about modelling.

If you want to look at the followinf link you will find a lot of interesting machine.

http://www.dmg-lib.org/dmglib/main/portal.jsp?context_setLangCode=en

Yours truly

sorry for my poor english...

Yves

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I have to tell you, most of you guys apologizing for your English skills do not need to worry.

Most of you (99.9%) have better English language skills than I encounter daily in the US.

No need to apologize!! Y'all be good by me :) <----See?

But, since I butted in: I am just trying to learn everything I can about the process of 3D Printing. I have been using 3D Graphics since 1990 starting with (Now) POVRay and been using computers, tearing them apart and software since 1985.

As I move to a more comfortable position of 3D Printing, I am branching out to study electronics. I have not touched a circuit board since my Navy days in 1981.

I have a UM3E and love it. It has been all I hoped for and it really stands up to the punishment I can dish out. I tend to push things to find limitations and many times, happy little accidents along the way.

The community has been most beneficial to myself in ways I cannot begin to describe and haunt the boards for anything I can learn.

Happy to always see new people, viewpoints and be corrected :)

Let's make it hap'n cap'n!!

I am an old fart.....

Edited by Guest
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Hi @YvesRossignol, thank you for your introduction. Sounds like you are a very busy bee with more ideas on your hands than time. Can you share what your latest 69 hour 3D print was about? We have a dedicated 3D Print section which is perfect for sharing prints.

Since you are also an educator, we have a couple of pages dedicated to education.

Please check them if you are curious, we have some educational blogposts, and here is an overview of more related content.

Do you also use your Ultimaker in the classroom, or is it more for your personal projects?

Hopefully you will find the help and inspiration you are looking for in our community, just like @kmanstudios :)

Edited by Guest

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Regarding your bed, if I'm looking at the right photo, it looks like you should level your bed slightly higher.

I've experimented a bit more and you are correct. The bed was too close. I really like the active leveling, so it was a bit of work to get this manually leveled. I think I've found a solution by adding some starting Z code in the forum. I will try again later today and post my results to that topic (https://ultimaker.com/en/community/38774-active-leveling-too-close)

And cool lamps! Did you print them round / cylinder shape, or flat and did you fit it around a structure after making it soft in warm water? (assuming it is a PLA print).

Yes, they are printed as is. Printing them flat and bending them is actually not a bad idea. I think that would decrease print time and increase the quality. (those on Etsy are printed with my old i3 clone, the new ones are already much better)

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It would probably indeed reduce print time, and I can imagine it could also improve some surfaces. If you want to print very fine details, printing them at around 45º would probably help, but in this case with this large surface that would probably not be a viable solution.

But in case you ever need to print something smaller, keep it in mind :)

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Hi @YvesRossignol, thank you for your introduction. Sounds like you are a very busy bee with more ideas on your hands than time. Can you share what your latest 69 hour 3D print was about? We have a dedicated 3D Print section which is perfect for sharing prints.

Since you are also an educator, we have a couple of pages dedicated to education.

Please check them if you are curious, we have some educational blogposts, and here is an overview of more related content.

Do you also use your Ultimaker in the classroom, or is it more for your personal projects?

Hopefully you will find the help and inspiration you are looking for in our community, just like @kmanstudios :)

I use my ultimaker only for personnal project. I promise to you when my design will be protected to show you this 69 hours print. But before I must protect my idea.

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