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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

[print=4117][/print]

A remix from @flowalistik fantastic designs.

I did it to try to win the Cults3d Contest, but specially because I always use my printers for work and no fun, and this was FUN to do.

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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

An ex co-worker gave me a small Dopey figurine (from Snow White) when she left.  I thought it'd be fun to scan it and print her out a replica.  As I was preparing to take pictures for uploading to 123DCatch, it slipped and fell to the floor, shattering into a million pieces :(.  When I told her about the accident, she said she'd prefer some other Disney character.  So I had her browse through thingiverse & youmagine and she found this Mickey-Stormtrooper.  

Printed in MatterHackers pro ABS.  The support for his ear fell over, so I quickly paused the print and crazy glued (with kicker) a strip of ABS I had laying around to the brim and used some white wire to secure it to the head.  Worked perfectly!  The final finish was done with a quick 30 second boiling acetone steam bath.  I put a mason jar on my build plate with about 1/4" of acetone in the bottom.  Raise the temp of the plate until the rest of the jar steams up and quickly dangle the piece in until it looks shiny.

stormtroopermickey.thumb.jpg.85fa9c92775e0ccdab3955424c9211fa.jpg

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Posted · Post your latest print!

That vapour polishing doesn't always look that great due to lost detail but it looks perfect on this print.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

Thanks! :) Yeah, I ruined plenty of prints way back when I first toyed around with the vapor. I was surprised how fast this one smoothed out. Was literally 20 or 30 seconds. Another thing I love about the process is that once the acetone evaporates, that smooth skin seems harder and more durable than when first pulled off the print bed.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

Now, that the hero of my childhood has died, i´d like to show you this little diorama.

I started some time ago, but i finished it today. All vehicles are printed with a 0.25 nozzle, the landscape with a 0.4 nozzle. Most of the parts are made in 3dsMax and Zbrush.

I hope you like it and godspeed, RogerDiorama1.thumb.jpg.6b190760b3849f161a9db651f67cca80.jpg[/media]

Diorama1.thumb.jpg.6b190760b3849f161a9db651f67cca80.jpg

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Posted · Post your latest print!

Ok, I'm not sure I can measure up with the previous post, but thought I would share my latest nevertheless. :-)

My wife, since the beginning, sort of tolerates my adventure into 3d printing.

Yesterday evening she mentioned something about upcoming GoT season 7. I jumped at the chance saying "well, why don't we print you a dragon?" She gave me a funny look (since I mainly print utilitarian stuff), but I introduced her to thingiverse... and an hour later, she came back with a model (drogon-from-game-of-thrones-6660 on myminifactory).

She grumbled when I have put it in cura (print time 1day and change), so I resized to about 75%, print time 15h. Queued the model for printing in the morning.

After coming back from work, I found my wife in a good mood. She kept on checking the printer during the day, liking the result.

In the end, I, too, like the result quite a bit:

s01.jpeg

s02-1.jpeg

s05.jpeg

s12.jpeg

s13.jpeg

s15.jpeg

(Printed with Swissfil gold, Cura 2.6, Fine setting, no support/adhesion, held on the bed with 3D Lac, no post processing)

If only I could convince my phone to focus on the head.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

Surface quality looks great! :)

.. so did she already look for a second model to print? ;)

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Posted · Post your latest print!

its always lovely to see such a beautiful clean print... and i love the color :)

Ian

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Posted · Post your latest print!

Air quality sensor housing, for details see https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2499253

Which materials did you use? PLA and Nylon?

I used PLA for both parts of the housing; the mounting arm and (temporary) base are Nylon. Eventually it will be attached to a wooden post in the garden.

Maybe to make the case weather proof, it needs to get a paint cover, but that's something I have not made (yet).

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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

I have left PLA out doors for a few years now exposed to sun and rain and it still has the original color, look, feel, etc.  It has no visible erosion or decay.  Although paint might make a better water tight seal.

If you do decide to paint I recommend any automotive primer spray paint (should say it's for plastic and metal) followed by any exterior paint, followed by several layers of clear coat.  Easiest if all 3 are spray paint from an auto parts store but hardware stores should have all this as well.

I'm told acrylic paints also stick well to PLA.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

I have left PLA out doors for a few years now exposed to sun and rain and it still has the original color, look, feel, etc.  It has no visible erosion or decay.  Although paint might make a better water tight seal.

If you do decide to paint I recommend any automotive primer spray paint (should say it's for plastic and metal) followed by any exterior paint, followed by several layers of clear coat.  Easiest if all 3 are spray paint from an auto parts store but hardware stores should have all this as well.

I'm told acrylic paints also stick well to PLA.

 

Acrylics do stick quite well, but I second the automotive paints for sheer toughness. I use a mix, but almost always prime with an automotive enamel or lacquer. Even on store-bought models (polystyrene plastic kits).

Enamel will always go on Lacquer as it is not as chemically hot. You can lacquer over enamel if you work with very thin coats to build up a shell that will not penetrate to melt the enamel. But you must be very careful with that.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

I second the automotive paints for sheer toughness. I use a mix, but almost always prime with an automotive enamel or lacquer.

Hi kman -- this comment of yours stuck in my mind and I'd like to ask you:

Do you use an automotive etch primer before you apply enamels? The etch part is not really required is it since it is applied to plastic and not metal. What's your strategy when using auto paints?

Thank you my friend.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

I second the automotive paints for sheer toughness. I use a mix, but almost always prime with an automotive enamel or lacquer.

Hi kman -- this comment of yours stuck in my mind and I'd like to ask you:

Do you use an automotive etch primer before you apply enamels? The etch part is not really required is it since it is applied to plastic and not metal. What's your strategy when using auto paints?

Thank you my friend.

My strategy is to shoot first and do NOT ask questions...LOL....>pew pew<

Seriously, since I work with plastics primarily, or plasticized materials, standard primers work just fine. Anything that is rated to bond with plastics will work. Since there are so many varieties in different countries, that is the closest I can get to a recommendation. Remember I come from the modeling world of spaceships and cars. So, even though I have branched out into things beyond Tamiya and Testor's paints, the principles still apply. So, you can use them as a guide to chemical compositions.

The most important thing is to remember the chemical compositions going into your mix.

Enamels over lacquers is fine.

Lacquers over enamels are usually not good as a lacquer will be a more chemically 'hot' substance and do some crazy things to your enamels underneath.

If you are going to use lacquers, it is best to use a lacquer primer for this reason.

Lacquers go just fine over plastics for the most part.

Also, do test paints over failed print parts and such to see how it melds or works.

And by the way, I do like the Krylons over most plastics as well as Duplicolor, especially some of their metal paints.

Also, depending on the effect you wish to achieve, primer color may or may not matter.

If I want a blindingly bright Red, I will put it over a white primer as , unless you are really gunking up your layers, light passes through, and bounces off the white, brightening the Red.

If I want a deep Cherry Red, I will use a black primer and then build up the Red over that until I get the color I want as it will still let the light pass through, but not bounce out as much.

Depending on the model will depend on if I polish or use a clear on it.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

Amazing info - much appreciated. I hear what you say about shooting and testing first!

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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

I dug up these images from past works of store bought kits to illustrate what I meant above with the differences between primer(undercoat) colours can have.

This is a white primer with metal flake red over that. It has an enamel clear coat to disguise the decals as part of the paint.

MonkeeMobile_BrightRed.jpg

And this is my Evil Iron Trike Body. You can see the black under the fairings over the wheels. This was polished and does not have a clear coat.

EvilIronDeepRed.jpg

In both cases, the same Red Metal Flake layered over different Primer colours for effect of brightness or deepness of colour

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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

That's an amazing finish kman!!! Thanks for posting these. Shows the importance of choosing appropriate filament and primer colors.

I've been thinking about how to paint the masks i printed and how to mask different areas for different colors. The idea of cutting up masking tape doesn't appeal very much so I've drawn on my pottery experience and ordered some latex masking liquid which, when dry, can be peeled off like post-sunburn skin.

Don't know how well it will work but it's worth a try.

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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

That's an amazing finish kman!!! Thanks for posting these. Shows the importance of choosing appropriate filament and primer colors.

I've been thinking about how to paint the masks i printed and how to mask different areas for different colors. The idea of cutting up masking tape doesn't appeal very much so I've drawn on my pottery experience and ordered some latex masking liquid which, when dry, can be peeled off like post-sunburn skin.

Don't know how well it will work but it's worth a try.

The only reason I use different filament colors is for transparent or translucent filaments where paint or primer would not allow for the passage of light.

A primer should be very clean and smooth. One of the secrets to a good finish is a good, super smooth primer coat. But, your primer, as you sand, reprime, sand and so on will become opaque allowing you a perfect surface with which to get artistic with the painting choices. And, a good bit of either wet sanding or wiping with a damp material to make sure the dust is off the surface is imperative as the dust can make either scratches as you get finer and finer on your sandpaper or just make huge (relatively) bumps that can ruin the effect.

For instance, even though the Red Metal Flake was a 'gloss' on both models, the decaling on the MonkeeMobile required a coat of flat clear to bring the paint and decal to a consistent surface quality and then putting on the clear coats in light, even coating.

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Posted · Post your latest print!

I get it - there's more to primers than I first thought. Or for print quality to go through the roof and be affordable :)

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Posted · Post your latest print!

.......Or for print quality to go through the roof and be affordable :)

I do not understand...sorry.....

But, I will have to say that as someone who has put a lot of injection molded kits together, I am really not having to do a lot more on my 3D Prints than I did on them.

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Posted (edited) · Post your latest print!

I meant, via some new ways of thinking, for printed model output quality to be high enough that all the sanding and futzing around is nearly eliminated. Although I can appreciate that for some the sanding and futzing is part of the enjoyment of bonding with the print :)

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Posted · Post your latest print!

I meant, via some new ways of thinking, for printed model output quality to be high enough that all the sanding and futzing around is nearly eliminated. Although I can appreciate that for some the sanding and futzing is part of the enjoyment of bonding with the print :)

Qhhhh....ok, I get it. Yeah, I am not so sure that is feasible. If you go and purchase any model (Again, focusing on plastics and in this case, commercially produced injection molded parts) there will always be some futzing.

You still have to:

  • trim flashing
  • Fill gaps; putty and whatnot
  • Fix warps
  • Prime and sand to increase paintability
  • Sand to remove even the super tiny imperfections of dust, little spray droplets
  • Polish or clear coat if a shiny appearance is required

The list could go on. But, you can learn to minimize the effects.

And, sometimes it just comes down to what you need. A widget that will be weathered and serve a purely mechanical function may not need any of that, but require dimensional stability.

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